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Bernie Sanders has won the Democratic presidential primary in Wisconsin. It's the Vermont senator's sixth straight win over front-runner Hillary Clinton in recent weeks. The victory in a large state gives a powerful political boost to Sanders backers.yeezy boost 750 for sale,yeezy boost 750 canada,yeezy boost 750 black. But the results barely dent Clinton's significant delegate lead for the race nomination. Because Democrats award delegates proportionally, both candidates will add to their tallies. Clinton has the edge both in pledged delegates and the party insiders known as superdelegates. Sanders is favored to win the next primary caucuses in Wyoming on Saturday.

Both candidates are turning their attention to the April 19 contest in New York.yeezy boost 750 for sale,yeezy boost 750 canada,yeezy boost 750 black. A loss there would be a major political blow for Clinton, who represented the state for eight years in the Senate. A potential Donald Trump presidency inspires more excitement among Wisconsin's GOP primary voters than the other two remaining candidates — but also more fear. About a quarter say they're excited about Trump, while less than 15 percent say that of either of his rivals. At the same time, nearly 4 in 10 say they're scared about what Trump would do as president, while only about 1 in 10 say that about either Cruz or Kasich, according to early results of exit polls conducted for The Associated Press and television networks by Edison Research. In the case of a brokered convention, nearly 6 in 10 Republicans say the party should nominate the candidate with the most support in the primaries, while just 4 in 10 say it should nominate the candidate the delegates think would make the best nominee.

Democratic voters in Wisconsin are divided on the effect of trade on unemployment,yeezy boost 750 for sale,yeezy boost 750 canada,yeezy boost 750 black. an issue that Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders has played up in a flood of television ads over the past few weeks. About 45 percent of Democratic voters say trade with other countries takes away jobs in this country, while nearly 4 in 10 see trade as beneficial, according to early results of exit polls conducted for The Associated Press and television networks by Edison Research. Only about 10 percent see trade as having no effect on job in the United States. The polls indicate a mixed response on an issue that Sanders has put at the center of some of his most-aired television ads. Over the past month, Sanders has poured about $2.4 million into radio and television ads in Wisconsin and one of his top aired ads has tucked in several subtle jabs at former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's record on trade, according to data from political advertising tracker Kantar Media. One Sanders ad touts the senator as standing with American workers, linking jobs losses to the North American Free Trade Agreement, which was signed into law by former President Bill Clinton, and the Trans-Pacific Partnership, which Clinton initially supported but has since said she opposes.

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